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Voice SIG: Developing Voice UI's in Java using SpeechObjects

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$10.00
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Description

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    Speaker

    Debajit Ghosh, Architect - Nuance Communications

    View the PowerPoint Presentation

    Location

    Cubberly Community Center
    4000 Middlefield Rd. Room H-1
    Palo Alto, CA

    Agenda

    6:00-6:30pm Registration / Networking / Refreshments (Free Pizza!)
    6:30-8:00pm Presentation / Q&A
    8:00-8:30pm Networking
     

    Cost

    $10 for non-SDForum Members
    No charge for SDForum members and students with ID

    Presentation Overview

    The popular JavaBeans component model has enabled Java developers to quickly build customizable user interfaces for their applications. These user interfaces are not restricted to graphical ones, but also include voice user interfaces used in telephone-based speech recognition applications. This talk will examine SpeechObjects, an open, internationalized, Java-based framework for building such voice user interface components. We will discuss how this framework allows for encapsulation of expert speech and dialog experience into reusable components and also allows Java developers to build highly sophisticated speech recognition applications in very short periods of time. We will also discuss how SpeechObjects are being used for traditional call-center applications, as well as in web-based VoiceXML application development.
     

    Speaker Profile

    Debajit Ghosh

    Debajit Ghosh, the architect for the SpeechObjects software product, has been with Nuance since 1998. He worked on the design and implementation of the SpeechObjects architecture as well a number of Foundation SpeechObjects and advanced tutorial applications. Prior to this role, Debajit was involved in designing and developing applications in the Telecom group within Nuance's Professional Services organization. He received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT, focusing on natural language understanding. During this time, he also worked in the speech recognition group at Compaq's Cambridge Research Laboratory.